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Scottish & Celtic

Our beautiful selection from this incredibly artistic time ignites the imagination and brings to life a world that was both down to earth and inspiring in its spirit. Let our incredible selection take you back in time where women danced like faeries, druids reigned and William Wallace fought for freedom.

Scottish & Celtic Swords

Historically, the claymore and the basket-hilted broadsword are the two most celebrated Scottish and Celtic swords. The claymore was a big medieval sword that was used well into the Renaissance period; it was most effective when wielded with two hands. The basket-hilted broadsword was used from the 16th century onwards. This sword was lighter and more versatile in battle; its importance to the clans was underlined when firearms entered the fray and made armor and the claymore somewhat ineffective. Basket-hilted broadswords were essential for the clansmen and one of their favorite fighting styles was a broadsword in one hand and shield (targe) on the other. Later on, the Scottish military was issued with a similar sword called the backsword, as only one side of the blade was sharpened.

Museum Replicas offers a broad range of Scottish and Celtic weapons including claymores, basket-hilted swords, and short swords. Two of the blades in this excellent selection are inspired by iconic figures in Scottish history – William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. All weapons are crafted of top-grade material by the finest craftsmen in the field. The details are exquisite and on point and the swords do justice to Scotland’s glorious past. Browse through our collection, pick one (or more) of these classics and let loose the Highlander in you!

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Scottish & Celtic Knives and Daggers

Of all Scottish and Celtic knives and daggers, the most popular was the Highland dirk. This long, multipurpose knife was used for skinning and cutting through animal bone and was also a great close-combat weapon. The preferred technique was to hold the dirk with the point facing downwards. Following the uprising in 1745, many broadswords were turned into dirks.

Other popular Scottish and Celtic daggers included the smaller sgian-dubh. This single-edged knife was meant for preparing food and useful for self-defense. It was kept in a holster near the armpit or up a sleeve. “Dubh” is the Gaelic term for black and so it is no surprise that the scabbard and handle were typically fashioned from dark-colored leather or wood. Due to its size, the sgian-dubh became popular in Scotland in the 18th century when carrying weapons was prohibited in the country. After the ban was lifted, these knives were worn openly in the stocking.

Museum Replicas carries a wide selection of dirks and dubhs that are as good as any you’ll find. Each knife is made from high-quality material and with beautiful detail. These items can augment any knife collection and if you are seeking the perfect companion piece to complete your Scottish ensemble, you have come to the right place.

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Armor

Find authentic replica shields from the Scottish Highlands.

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Scottish and Celtic Clothing

From Scottish kilts to dresses for that bonnie lass, all can be found at MuseumReplicas.com.

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Top Customer Reviews

Review of: Triangular Spear Head

Great looking spear head .  I Do not  know why it was made to fit a 1 inch shaft.  I think that it will take a good edge .
Chester
Reviewed by: Chester, July 30, 2021

Review of: Claymore by Paul Chen / Hanwei

Great looking sword and appears to be an excellent reproduction.
Reviewed by: James, June 27, 2021

Review of: European Boar Spear Head

Its great, but not as good as the winged spear head the use to have.
Reviewed by: Tyrone, April 25, 2021

Review of: Claymore by Paul Chen / Hanwei

My hopes weren't TOO high at this price point, but I was very impressed. The sword is very well put together with good attention to detail. This is a heavy claymore that's quite front heavy, so go easy. This is a brutal weapon, not one of finesse, in spite of it's quite attractive looks.
Reviewed by: Richard, April 17, 2021

Review of: Claymore by Paul Chen / Hanwei

An excellent weapon. At first I was daunted that there were no reviews but upon further research I found nothing but positive reviews.   The blade is surprisingly thick and from what I have seen can take quite the beating. It is just flexible enough not to break, but if you don’t prefer your swords being flexible, it is also very sturdy. I haven’t seen any time where it bent other than when I was actively trying, which took a lot of effort! It has a beautiful design, if a bit simple, but I think that adds to the authenticity and overall longevity. If you were also looking at the antiqued varient, I would warn that it is only a finish, so if you sharpen or maintenance the blade it will rub off. I think this blade is an impressive height, and just about the longest you can go without looking gaudy. I was glad that I bought this sword and not a longer one, because I think it approaches the upper range regarding the ability to actually use it properly. It’s weight is not to be underestimated, and it’s balance is perfect for its use. My only warning is... learn how to properly swing it! If you think you know how, think again! I hurt my shoulder with a bad swing, but that user error could have easily been avoided by reading a couple of paragraphs!
Reviewed by: Caden, November 07, 2020

Review of: Celtic Cross Scottish Targe Shield

This is a beautiful targe! I am very pleased. Now waiting for my basket-hilt broadsword to complete the set with my dirk! ERSJR
Reviewed by: Edmund R., November 06, 2020

Review of: Twisted Forged Iron Leaf Brooch Cloak Pin

I bought a fleece cloak about a year ago, and while I love it, the closure was a flimsy ribbon of fabric with a tiny button. Not that great.
But with this pin? My cloak isn't coming undone no matter what. And it's much more stylish.
Bigger than I thought it would be, but wonderfully crafted. I can't wait to field test it this winter.
Reviewed by: Stephen, October 23, 2020

Review of: Scottish Battle Targe Shield

I have had this piece for about a year, but it wasn't until last month that I wore it to the local Scottish Fair. I got many compliments on the targe, but everyone was even more impressed when I showed them the spike on the center boss!. (I wasn't allowed to have the spike attached as I walked around, but could "demonstrate" it when in a group.)
The look is not too ornate, but simple and handsome as if owned by a trusted clan warrior rather than Laird or Chieftain. Seeing several targes in museums, this is as authentic as it gets. I wore it with my back-sword and dirk, and was well kitted to be sure!
Great piece at a a good price!
-Rick Miller
Reviewed by: , August 28, 2020

Review of: Twisted Forged Iron Leaf Brooch Cloak Pin

This is a beautiful cloak pin.  Fitting for a wool great kilt.
Reviewed by: Michael, June 20, 2020

Review of: Chocolate Brown Long Skirt

This Chocolate Brown Skirt is wonderful. This is a piece of “regular” clothing, not costume- like at all.  The fabric is a lightweight, durable, a beautiful, chocolate brown - love the color! I’d wear this to work if the pleating were just a tad bit less but it’s perfect for my historical presentations.  It pairs well with a crisp white peasant blouse and is historically relevant for many periods. A small crinoline may be worn to dress it up but it’s a nice ladies‘ travel,  leisure or peasant style as is. I’m thrilled to find this versatile, genuine garment in period style.  I’m 5’9”, size 10 with a smaller waist, ordered the large, length and waist was perfect.  Highly recommend.
Reviewed by: AndreA, June 14, 2020