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Scottish & Celtic

Our beautiful selection from this incredibly artistic time ignites the imagination and brings to life a world that was both down to earth and inspiring in its spirit. Let our incredible selection take you back in time where women danced like faeries, druids reigned and William Wallace fought for freedom.

Scottish & Celtic Swords

Historically, the claymore and the basket-hilted broadsword are the two most celebrated Scottish and Celtic swords. The claymore was a big medieval sword that was used well into the Renaissance period; it was most effective when wielded with two hands. The basket-hilted broadsword was used from the 16th century onwards. This sword was lighter and more versatile in battle; its importance to the clans was underlined when firearms entered the fray and made armor and the claymore somewhat ineffective. Basket-hilted broadswords were essential for the clansmen and one of their favorite fighting styles was a broadsword in one hand and shield (targe) on the other. Later on, the Scottish military was issued with a similar sword called the backsword, as only one side of the blade was sharpened.

Museum Replicas offers a broad range of Scottish and Celtic weapons including claymores, basket-hilted swords, and short swords. Two of the blades in this excellent selection are inspired by iconic figures in Scottish history – William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. All weapons are crafted of top-grade material by the finest craftsmen in the field. The details are exquisite and on point and the swords do justice to Scotland’s glorious past. Browse through our collection, pick one (or more) of these classics and let loose the Highlander in you!

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Scottish & Celtic Knives and Daggers

Of all Scottish and Celtic knives and daggers, the most popular was the Highland dirk. This long, multipurpose knife was used for skinning and cutting through animal bone and was also a great close-combat weapon. The preferred technique was to hold the dirk with the point facing downwards. Following the uprising in 1745, many broadswords were turned into dirks.

Other popular Scottish and Celtic daggers included the smaller sgian-dubh. This single-edged knife was meant for preparing food and useful for self-defense. It was kept in a holster near the armpit or up a sleeve. “Dubh” is the Gaelic term for black and so it is no surprise that the scabbard and handle were typically fashioned from dark-colored leather or wood. Due to its size, the sgian-dubh became popular in Scotland in the 18th century when carrying weapons was prohibited in the country. After the ban was lifted, these knives were worn openly in the stocking.

Museum Replicas carries a wide selection of dirks and dubhs that are as good as any you’ll find. Each knife is made from high-quality material and with beautiful detail. These items can augment any knife collection and if you are seeking the perfect companion piece to complete your Scottish ensemble, you have come to the right place.

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Scottish and Celtic Costumes

From Scottish kilts to dresses for that bonnie lass, all can be found at MuseumReplicas.com.

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Top Customer Reviews

Review of: The Bannockburn Sword

I was not sure what to expect when I picked this up on the deal of the day, but I was pleasantly surprised. It is one of those swords that shows better in person. The blade has authority but the hilt is large enough for a second hand if needed. Everything is right and tight and the double fullers a executed beautifully.
Reviewed by: Dan, January 20, 2020

Review of: Late Scottish Broadsword

I saw a photo of the sword was copied from.  It was in the National Museum of Antiquities in Scotland and the sword was dated circa 1570.   The Windlass reproduction looks very much like it.  This is a HEAVY sword!  The hilt is so big I can get both of my long slender hands in it, (one on either side).  All of the pieces of the basket are very thick. The blade is well made and substantial.  The etchings on the blade are actually slightly cut into the blade, not just painted on.  I haven't cut anything yet but will once I sharpen it.  I am impressed!  If you get it you may want to check out Youtube's Matt Easton on Scholagladiatoria to learn exercises to strengthen your arm for a one handed sword.
Reviewed by: Les, January 11, 2020

Review of: Brown Sporran w/ Braided Tassels

This has been a great addition to my Renaissance Festival garb.  It works with my kilts as well as just being a nice side bag for essential accessories.
Reviewed by: Rory, January 07, 2020

Review of: Eglinton Basket-Hilt Sword

I purchased this as a "Deal of the Day".  I've had my eye on it for quite a while and was delighted to see it come up on sale.  It's stunning.  Feels great in the hand.  Nice weight and balance.  I had it sharpened and am pleased with the blade.  This is an item that now looks to be on the closeout list.  I'd suggest getting it before it's gone.  You won't regret it.
Reviewed by: Michael, January 02, 2020

Review of: Sgian Dubh

Really nice addition to my Highland outfit.  I ordered mine sharpened for the sake of authenticity.
Reviewed by: Mike, November 28, 2019

Review of: Sgian Dubh

As a Museum Replicas customer for over thirty years I am pleased to say that your products continue to impress and live up to the quality that I have come to expect from you.  This small knife is everything it was advertised to be.
Reviewed by: Eugene, October 13, 2019

Review of: Scottish Cap

A nice, warm woolen bonnet to keep you warm! I wore mine with pride at the Highland Games at Grandfather Mountain, NC. It came in one size, and that was HUGE! I wear a 7-3/8", and I had to take this in over an inch. Still well-made and warm.
Reviewed by: Edmund R., October 12, 2019

Review of: Scottish Lion Flag

Well-made flag. This is a historical flag - this would be illegal in Scotland unless you could show proper affiliation with a Clan. On display next to my driveway here in Virginia - considerable lower than Old Glory! ERSJR
Reviewed by: Edmund R., October 12, 2019

Review of: Sgian Dubh

Well-made. The wood handle is so smooth on the back it looks like plastic, but the carving on the front is precise. The sheath fits well, but will be all but invisible as it will be in my piper's hose. Blade is good steel - I will sharpen it myself. No sense having a "black knife" with no edge! ERSJR
Reviewed by: Edmund R., October 12, 2019

Review of: Damascus Sgian Dubh Raider Knife

This is my first edged weapon from MR, so I was very excited considering the quality that I was expecting. I misread the dimensions on this, so this turned out to be much larger than I thought it would be. No complaints on the size though.

1st, the dagger. It essentially looks as it does in the photo. Since this is handmade you know to expect minor differences and I'm not disappointed. It is amazingly light to hold and even though it appears to have been sharpened, the cutting edge is rather dull, not a big deal. Sharpening a knife is rather easy. It does have a razor sharp point and easily pierced many cardboard boxes I have. I haven't tried it on anything thicker yet as I don't want to risk damaging the tip. Based on how sturdy the knife feels, I have no doubt this would pierce clothing and flesh quite well if I was forced to use it for self-defense.

2nd, the sheath. Since this is my first experience with old-world craftsmanship when it comes to medieval styled weapons, I don't have much to compare it to. The knife sits loosely in the sheath and the strap is the only thing that will hold it in place if you decide to walk around with this on your belt. Otherwise I feel this would fall out very easily. The sheath's construction seems decent, but I'm unsure at this point how well I would rate the quality since I haven't had the time to use it on a day-to-day basis.

Overall as a combo I'm giving this five stars.
Reviewed by: Erik, September 28, 2019