4.9 9

Brass Basket Hilt Claymore

#500922
$285.00

This Scottish basket-hilt Claymore is the equal to any raised by clansmen as they overran the English at the Battle of Falkirk on Jan. 17th, 1746. The pierced basket-hilt is a faithful reproduction of one found on the Culloden Moor. The fully tempered high carbon steel blade is of the typical fullered, double-edge, broadsword pattern of the 1500's - 1800's. The basket also has a rich red cloth liner and a scabbard is included. Made by Windlass Steelcrafts®. Can be sharpened for additional fee.
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In stock

Overview


This Scottish basket-hilt Claymore is the equal to any raised by clansmen as they overran the English at the Battle of Falkirk on Jan. 17th, 1746. The pierced basket-hilt is a faithful reproduction of one found on the Culloden Moor. The fully tempered high carbon steel blade is of the typical fullered, double-edge, broadsword pattern of the 1500's - 1800's. The basket also has a rich red cloth liner and a scabbard is included. Made by Windlass Steelcrafts®. Can be sharpened for additional fee.
Can be personalized with 3 Initials (select at right).

Click here for details on our personalization service and return policy

Specifications


Products specifications
Overall Length 39-1/2"
Blade Length 32-1/2"
Blade Width 1-3/4"
Blade Thickness 3/16"
weight 3lbs 14oz
Material 1065 High Carbon Steel
Edge Unsharpened
Sharpening Available
Engraving Available

Reviews


I was very pleased when I received the sword.  It was much better than I expected and will be pleased to display with my collection.
From: Louis, March 20, 2016
It is a wonderful sword. Keep up the good work!
From: Michael, May 18, 2015
This is a beautiful piece and quite well made.  I had mine sharpened and it is truly a fearsome weapon and one of my favorites.
From: kevin, January 30, 2014
I have always wanted one of these swords.  It is unique, steeped in history and beautiful in the hand.
From: Anthony, July 06, 2012
Claymore, broadsword - I don't care. Both words sound great to me!! I have six swords from this company, and they are REAL!! No fake pot metal, stainless steel or the like. The Scotts of the 1800's had no steel like this! Get yours sharpened, they do a great job! And get the "rust blocker", It works!!!
From: Frank, August 25, 2011
This sword looks absolutly smashing and ones like them can be seen in portraits of Scottish clansmen of the period described. The term "Claymore" comes from the combination of two Gaelic words: CLAIDHEAMH which means "sword" and MÒR which means "big, great, large (you get the idea). The gaelic for broad is "leathann" and for two handed is "dà-làimh". It's tough for those who don't speak Gaelic to pronounce many Gaelic words, hence the term "Claymore"!! I look forward to owning one of these someday to complete my kilt outfit.
From: Ruairidh, April 09, 2010
From: elias, August 02, 2009
This is a beautiful and very well put together sword. However, it is not a claymore. this is a common mistake, but it is simply called a basket hilt broadsword.
From: Nicholas, April 10, 2009
This sword is extremely well balanced and masterfully created. Very proud of wear this with a kilt!
From: Brad, December 25, 2008

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Products specifications
Overall Length 39-1/2"
Blade Length 32-1/2"
Blade Width 1-3/4"
Blade Thickness 3/16"
weight 3lbs 14oz
Material 1065 High Carbon Steel
Edge Unsharpened
Sharpening Available
Engraving Available
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