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Scottish & Celtic

Our beautiful selection from this incredibly artistic time ignites the imagination and brings to life a world that was both down to earth and inspiring in its spirit. Let our incredible selection take you back in time where women danced like faeries, druids reigned and William Wallace fought for freedom.

Scottish & Celtic Swords

Historically, the claymore and the basket-hilted broadsword are the two most celebrated Scottish and Celtic swords. The claymore was a big medieval sword that was used well into the Renaissance period; it was most effective when wielded with two hands. The basket-hilted broadsword was used from the 16th century onwards. This sword was lighter and more versatile in battle; its importance to the clans was underlined when firearms entered the fray and made armor and the claymore somewhat ineffective. Basket-hilted broadswords were essential for the clansmen and one of their favorite fighting styles was a broadsword in one hand and shield (targe) on the other. Later on, the Scottish military was issued with a similar sword called the backsword, as only one side of the blade was sharpened.

Museum Replicas offers a broad range of Scottish and Celtic weapons including claymores, basket-hilted swords, and short swords. Two of the blades in this excellent selection are inspired by iconic figures in Scottish history – William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. All weapons are crafted of top-grade material by the finest craftsmen in the field. The details are exquisite and on point and the swords do justice to Scotland’s glorious past. Browse through our collection, pick one (or more) of these classics and let loose the Highlander in you!

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Scottish & Celtic Knives and Daggers

Of all Scottish and Celtic knives and daggers, the most popular was the Highland dirk. This long, multipurpose knife was used for skinning and cutting through animal bone and was also a great close-combat weapon. The preferred technique was to hold the dirk with the point facing downwards. Following the uprising in 1745, many broadswords were turned into dirks.

Other popular Scottish and Celtic daggers included the smaller sgian-dubh. This single-edged knife was meant for preparing food and useful for self-defense. It was kept in a holster near the armpit or up a sleeve. “Dubh” is the Gaelic term for black and so it is no surprise that the scabbard and handle were typically fashioned from dark-colored leather or wood. Due to its size, the sgian-dubh became popular in Scotland in the 18th century when carrying weapons was prohibited in the country. After the ban was lifted, these knives were worn openly in the stocking.

Museum Replicas carries a wide selection of dirks and dubhs that are as good as any you’ll find. Each knife is made from high-quality material and with beautiful detail. These items can augment any knife collection and if you are seeking the perfect companion piece to complete your Scottish ensemble, you have come to the right place.

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Scottish and Celtic Costumes

From Scottish kilts to dresses for that bonnie lass, all can be found at MuseumReplicas.com.

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Top Customer Reviews

Review of: Early Scottish Dirk

A beautiful and functional piece of work.  I would recommend this to anyone interested in a very good knife or this period/culture.
Reviewed by: Ray, August 23, 2019

Review of: Country Maid Skirt w/ Bodice Overdress

Just ordered this dress for my 13 year old daughter who outgrew her previous dress. We are in a guild and the SCA and period is important. Love it! It is so period, the material is a lovely broadcloth.  Very well constructed. I called customer service who measured the length and checked for boning which it has in the front. They were so helpful and amazing. We will get years of use out of this dress. Thank you Museum Replicas for providing a quality product at a great price! Renaissance Fair here we come!!
Reviewed by: Rose, May 31, 2019

Review of: Early Scottish Dirk

I received this as a gift and covered the scabbard's black leather with white hair-on calfskin to match a dress sporran.  There are many styles of dirk.  This style is based upon those which were made from the broken tips of swords: a basket-hilt claymore in this case (in our minds), the ID made obvious by the pattern of almost fullers on the blade.  This is a mini short sword... particularly heavy, and with none of the stiletto-like delicacy of a typical ballock knife.  You'd feel confident going up against an angry pit bull with this--- not so a ballock knife.
Reviewed by: Daniel C, March 14, 2019

Review of: The Warbrand Sword

I purchased my warbrand about ten years ago, back then it was sold with the corners of the handle rounded slightly, and is quite comfortable to hold. Very nice blade for the money. Very flexible blade that can "snake" it's way between plates of armor and return to true every time. The point of balance on mine is right where the grip ends and the blade begins, this makes it quite lively feeling.
Reviewed by: Brian, February 21, 2019

Review of: Brass Basket-Hilt Claymore

This is a great sword! The blade is flawless. The basket hilt is of heavy brass which has been lightened by the traditional grooves. The piercing work on the hilt consists of simple round holes. No hearts, three leafed clover, thistles, etc. This fits the pattern of something as old as the 16th century. It is very hard to find one of these from that early time period.
Reviewed by: Max, February 18, 2019

Review of: Eglinton Basket-Hilt Sword

This beautiful back sword is balanced for the thrust. It has an intricately detailed basket. A real knockout for looks. I found that the basket came too far around so that it hit my wrist on both sides on cutting strokes (admittedly not the main purpose for this sword). I removed the last loop on the bottom of each side of the basket with a Dremel tool and the problem was solved. Not too much to do for a sword of this quality. The basket still looks great, even with the slight modification.
Reviewed by: Max, February 13, 2019

Review of: Late Scottish Broadsword

This is a magnificent sword! The basket is large enough to fit my middle size hands when wearing a gauntlet. The basket is also fabulously detailed. Depending on how you count them, there are 30 odd welds in it. Balance is 5" above the basket as it should be and is intended to support cutting rather than thrusting. The etching and engraving are tops!
Reviewed by: Max, February 13, 2019

Review of: Scottish Lion Flag

Awesome! My tam is off to ye Scottland!
Reviewed by: eric, January 24, 2019

Review of: Early Scottish Dirk

I got this dirk not knowing what to expect, i've used it at reenactments and have had many compliments on it. it has stood up over the years and still looks great, well worth the money!
Reviewed by: John, January 23, 2019

Review of: The Warbrand Sword

Yes, I christened her the Pumpkin Chopper (Spanish).  This señorita cleaves pumpkins like nobody's business!  She's fast
Reviewed by: James, January 23, 2019